Computer Mouse

Jimmy/ March 27, 2022/ computer mouse

The widespread adoption of graphical user interfaces in the software of the 1980s and 1990s made mice all but indispensable for controlling computers. Operating systems sometimes apply acceleration, referred to as “ballistics”, to the motion reported by the mouse. For example, https://www.opentape.org/ versions of Windows prior to Windows XP doubled reported values above a configurable threshold, and then optionally doubled them again above a second configurable threshold. These doublings applied separately in the X and Y directions, resulting in very nonlinear response.

Although an analog stick allows the player more granular control, it is poor for certain movements, as the player’s input is relayed based on a vector of both the stick’s direction and magnitude. Thus, a small but fast movement (known as “flick-shotting”) using a gamepad requires the player to quickly move the stick from its rest position to the edge and back again in quick succession, a difficult maneuver. The effect of this is that a mouse is well suited not only to small, precise movements but also to large, quick movements and immediate, responsive movements; all of which are important in shooter gaming. This advantage also extends in varying degrees to similar game styles such as third-person shooters.

In 2008, Motion4U introduced its “OptiBurst” system using IR tracking for use as a Maya plugin. Another type of mechanical mouse, the “analog mouse” , uses potentiometers rather than encoder wheels, and is typically designed to be plug compatible with an analog joystick. The “Color Mouse”, originally marketed by RadioShack for their Color Computer (but also usable on MS-DOS machines equipped with analog joystick ports, provided the software accepted joystick input) was the best-known example. The relative movements of the mouse on the surface are applied to the position of the pointer on the screen, which signals the point where actions of the user take place, so hand movements are replicated by the pointer.

PC Gamer”. Later, inspired by the Star, Apple Computer released the Apple Lisa, which also used a mouse. Only with the release of the Apple Macintosh in 1984 did the mouse see widespread use. Windows 98 added built-in support for USB Human Interface Device class , with native vertical scrolling support.

Probably the best known example would be 3Dconnexion (“Logitech’s SpaceMouse”) from the early 1990s. This wireless mouse was worn on a ring around a finger, which enabled the thumb to access three buttons. Despite a certain appeal, it was finally discontinued because it did not provide sufficient resolution. The trackball, a related pointing device, was invented in 1946 by Ralph Benjamin as part of a post-World War II-era fire-control radar plotting system called the Comprehensive Display System .

Windows 2000 and Windows Me expanded this built-in support to 5-button mice. The German company Telefunken published on their early ball mouse on 2 October 1968. Telefunken’s mouse was sold as optional equipment for their computer systems. Bill English, builder of Engelbart’s original mouse, created a ball mouse in 1972 while working for Xerox PARC.

Microsoft’s mouse shipped in 1983, thus beginning the Microsoft Hardware division of the company. However, the mouse remained relatively obscure until the appearance of the Macintosh 128K (which included an updated https://www.wikipedia.org/ version of the single-button Lisa Mouse) in 1984, and of the Amiga 1000 and the Atari ST in 1985. Many games provide players with the option of mapping their own choice of a key or button to a certain control.

After id Software’s commercial hit of Doom, which did not support vertical aiming, competitor Bungie’s Marathon became the first first-person shooter to support using the mouse to aim up and down. The “invert” feature actually made the mouse behave in a manner that users now regard as non-inverted . Soon after, id Software released Quake, which introduced the invert feature as users now know it. Some mice also come with small “pads” attached to the bottom surface, also called mouse feet or mouse skates, that help the user slide the mouse smoothly across surfaces. To transmit their input, typical cabled mice use a thin electrical cord terminating in a standard connector, such as RS-232C, PS/2, ADB, or USB.

It is designed to fit natural hand position and movements, to reduce discomfort. In 2000, Logitech introduced a “tactile mouse” known as the “iFeel Mouse” developed by Immersion Corporation that contained a small actuator to enable the mouse to generate simulated physical sensations. Such a mouse can augment user-interfaces with haptic feedback, such as giving feedback when crossing a window boundary. To surf the internet by touch-enabled mouse was first developed in 1996 and first implemented commercially by the Wingman Force Feedback Mouse.

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